MANHATTAN COLLEGE

 

SOC 201                                                                                                                                     Dr. J. Sedaitis

Fall 2012                                                                                                                          Mailbox: MEM 427  

T/Th                                                                                                                                                                  

Hayden Hall Room 210                                                                                                            OFFICE HRS:

                                                                                                                                                  by appointment

                                                                                                                         judith.sedaitis@manhattan.edu

 

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

 

Course Description:

An introduction to the nature and scope of the science of sociology. Emphasis on societies, social structures and institutions, social groups, and on the various social processes associated with social organization, socialization, and social change. (Cr. 3)

 

Course Objectives:

Upon completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate familiarity with fundamental sociological concepts, theories and practices, including quantitative and/or qualitative methodological analysis.
  • Understand globalization and the increasing interconnectedness of societies.
  • Appreciate the importance of cultural diversity.
  • Deepen their ethical awareness and better understand the importance of social justice. 
  • Improve their communication, research and writing skills.
  • Strengthen critical thinking skills and cultivate a sociological imagination.

 

Synopsis:

In contrast to other disciplines, sociology focuses its attention specifically on the social level of human activity, i.e., on "society" or the social order, since, in the words of C. Wright Mills, “an individual can understand his own experience and gauge his own fate only by locating himself with his period.”  This course will focus on how the three classical traditions in social theory understand key social institutions and their relationship to the individual in society. Through short readings, reflections, lectures, and presentations, students are challenged to develop a critical understanding of the contemporary U.S. experience as well as to think cogently about some of the social problems that face our society.    

 

Textbook:

The book ordered for use in the course is:

Sociology: Seeing Ourselves by John Macionis & Nijole Benokraitis, 8th edition.

 

Reflections:   

Success in this course depends in large part on timely and consistent reflections on the homework readings.  Reflections involve careful reading of the assigned selection in its entirety and noting key points in your own words in a summary that is at least one full page long. Your short personal critique or response to the reading is optional, but invited. The critical thinking questions at the end of each selection are only guidelines and do not constitute an adequate overview of the material.  Full credit is giving to thoughtful, 1-2 page reflections handed in on time using original prose and quotation marks when copying or paraphrasing the text.  Late homework is accepted, but points are deducted, and no late work is accepted after you have been tested on it.  NO WORK is accepted via email or if you have a friend bring it to class.

 

 

 

 

 

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Course Evaluation:

The final average is a weighted total of the following: homework (30%), two quizzes (20%), Critical lens paper (15%), attendance (10%), and two exams (25%). As in all college courses, regular class attendance is required and the responsibility for making up any lost lecture material rests exclusively with the student. Current College policy requires the instructor to provide attendance information on each student to the Office of the Dean of Arts.

 

 

 

Grading for quizzes, the final exams and the research project will be based on a standard of:

   (A)=93-100%; (A-)=90-92%; (B+)=87-89; (B)=83-86%; (B-)=80-82%;

   (C+)=77-79%; (C)=73-76%; (C-)=70-72%; (D+)=68-69%; (D)=60-67; (F)=below 60;

 

 

 

Expectations for Academic Integrity: Plagiarism or any form of cheating in this course is unacceptable and will result in sanctions, including course failure and additional disciplinary measures to be determined by the appropriate College authorities. This course abides by the Manhattan College Policy on Academic Integrity. The essence of this policy is contained in the following statement:

“The basis of all learning is trust. Thus, academic integrity means that every member of the academic community accepts the responsibility to be open, honest, truthful, ethical, and accountable for all intellectual efforts, for all access to and presentation of data, facts, information, and opinions, and for all access to and us of data or other files (printed, oral, or digital) related in any way to students, faculty, staff, or administration. Academic integrity ensures the application of the highest academic standards and principles of conduct, honesty, and truth.” 

(Excerpted from the Manhattan College Policy on Academic Integrity)

 

 

 

Students Needing Special Accommodation: Students with learning disabilities that require accommodation should provide acceptable documentation the first week of classes to the Specialized Resource Center in Miguel Hall, Room 300—not to the faculty in charge of the course. The Specialized Resource Center will then contact the faculty in charge of the course with appropriate instructions to accommodate the student’s needs.

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COURSE OUTLINE:

 

DATE

HOMEWORK  DUE

In-Class

8/28

 Tues.

Welcome!

 

 

 

Levels of Analysis

 

8/30

Thurs.

DUE: Read #1 by C. Wright Mills and write at least a 1 page reflection/ summary. .

 

Durkheim, solidarity

 

 

 

9/4

 Tues.

 

9/6

Thurs.

DUE: Read #28, “The functions of crime” by Durkheim and write at least a 1 page reflection/ summary.

 

 

 

Crime, Religion,suicide

 

 

 

Dialectic, Marx

 

 

 

9/11

Tues.

DUE: Read #11, “The Manifesto of the Communist Party” and write at least a 1 page reflection/ summary.

Revolution, alienation.

 

 

 

9/13

Thurs.

 

 

Verstehen, Ideal types. 4 motives

9/18

 Tues.

 

NO Class on site. Watch the following YouTube video and summarize the main points.

 

 

No Class on site.

9/20

Thurs.

DUE: Read #55,”The Protestant Ethic,” by Max Weber and write at least a 1 page reflection/ summary. Also, video summary due.

 

 

Protestant Rev.

Review

 

9/25

Tues.

Study for FIRST QUIZ. Please bring a pencil. The quiz is multiple choice.

 

 

FIRST QUIZ, Cooley, Mead, the Self.

9/27

Thurs.

DUE: Read about Erving Goffman on moodle, under news forum. Answer the questions at the end, feel free to include your own thoughts & critique!  

 

Blauner, “Truth” Start Goffman.

 

10/2

Tues.

 

 

DUE: Read # 42.  "The Souls of Black Folk" by W. E. B. Du Bois and write at least a 1 page reflection/ summary.

 

 

 

Double Consciousness

 

10/4

Thurs.

CRITICAL LENS: Socialization, (gender roles, identity, parenting styles).

 

Student presentations

 

 

10/9

Tues.

Monday schedule. NO CLASS.

Study for upcoming exam!

 

 

 

10/11

Thurs.

MIDTERM EXAM: CUMULATIVE

 

 

 

10/16

Tues.

DUE: Read #22 by Deborah Tannen and write at least a 1 page reflection/ summary.

 

Conversation styles, Advertisement extra credit.

 

10/18

Thurs

 

Watch this short video & describe this student’s attitude towards education. List 3 reasons why it’s a challenge for her to get it.

 

 

Poverty of Culture Theory

 

10/23

Tues.

 

DUE: Read # 30.  "The Code of the Streets" by Elijah Anderson

 

Conflict theory: Wilson & Bourdieu.

 

 

10/25

Thurs.

 

 

 

DUE: Read #35 “Some Principles of Stratification,” by Davis & Moore and write at least a 1 page reflection/ summary.

 

 

 

Functionalist theory

10/30

Tues.

Watch these three videos and then explain on paper which of the three theories on poverty/stratification does each clip represent. Say WHY.

Video 1: 

Video 2: 

Video 3: 

 

Student presentations.

 

 

 

 

11/1

Thurs.

CRITICAL LENS: Poverty, inequality, welfare, gender wage gap.

 

 

Study for SECOND QUIZ. Please bring a pencil. The quiz is multiple choice.

 

 

 

 

SECOND QUIZ

11/6

Tues.

Don’t forget to vote, if you can!

DUE: Read #70, “Disenchantment of Modern Life,” by Max Weber and write at least a 1 page reflection/ summary.

 

 

3 types of authority

11/8

Thurs.

 

 

11/13

Tues

 

 

 

 

DUE: Read #49. "The Power Elite" by C. Wright Mills and write at least a 1 page reflection/ summary.

Iron Cage/ Ethics of Responsibility

 

 

Power elite vs, pluralism.

 

 

 

 

 

 

11/15

Thurs.

CRITICAL LENS: Government (regulations, new laws, election).

 

Student presentations.

 

 

 

11/20

Tues.

 

 

 

 

 

11/22

Thurs.

 

 

 

11/27

Tues.

 

 

11/29

Thurs.

 

 

12/4

Tues.

 

 

 

 

Government and economic theory. Watch and summarize these 2 clips (part 1 & 2). 

 

CRITICAL LENS: Economics & business (role of technology, of banks, of social networks).

 

 

NO Class. Happy Thanksgiving!

 

 

 

Read # 58. “Education and Inequality" by Samuel Bowles and Herbert Gintis and write at least a 1 page reflection/ summary.

 

 

CRITICAL LENS: Education (affirmative action, high cost).

 

 

 

Read the article by Henry Louis Gates, on moodle, under news forum. Answer the questions at the end.

 

 

 

 

Student presentations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No class.

 

 

 

Different teaching styles.

 

 

 

Student presentations.

 

 

 

Social change/ social movements.

 

 

 

STAY TUNED FOR FINAL EXAM DATE & TIME!